New England/North America

New England categoryNew England maps beginning in the colonial era continuing into the early 20th century. Of particular interest are the 1893 Cyclists’ Maps of Massachusetts. Our maps of North America include the United States, Canada, the American Southwest, including portions of northern Mexico.

1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Plan of Washington

 

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This Plan of Washington DC is from the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874, less than 10 years after the end of the Civil War, and before the formation of the District of Columbia.  Many important buildings are marked on the map, and for some their footprints are shown. A very finely detailed, hand colored map. A beautiful gift.

In 1884, the Washington Monument was completed. It was built in commemoration of the President George Washington. The structure was created to represent the man himself, standing tall and magnificent over all, however unadorned. Constructed of marble, granite, and bluestone gneise, it stands as the world’s tallest stone structure at 556 feet. The contributing marble was gathered mostly from the bordering state of Maryland. Construction began in 1848. A 23 year hiatus in construction occurred for various reasons, including lack of funds and the American Civil War. The total cost for its construction added up to nearly two million dollars. Talk about building such a monument while Washington was still in office had surfaced, but he brushed it aside, claiming the money could be put to better use.

Archival print from high-resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Quebec

 

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A beautiful County map of Quebec from the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874. A thoughtful gift for the love of history.

The Continental Army invaded Canada in the Battle of Quebec in 1775. The goal of the invasion was to gain control of Quebec and convince the people to join the revolution. This was the first major military initiative by the newly formed army. The army fought against British defenders of Quebec and proved the first major defeat for the Americans. A high price was paid through the death of General Richard Montgomery, the wounding of Benedict Arnold, and more than 400 American troops taken prisoner. In the battle and following siege, French speaking Canadians played an active part on both sides. Local residents provided the Continental Army with supplies. On the other side, the city’s defenders included a locally raised militia. A number of Canadian supporters accompanied the Americans when they retreated. The remaining supporters were punished by the British when they re-established control.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – St.Louis

 

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A beautiful hand colored map of the City of St.Louis in 1874 from the Mitchell World Atlas of that year. The location of St. Louis was  significant since pre-Columbian times due to the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers just north of the city and that confluence’s effect on trade which continues to this day. At the time of the making of this map, St. Louis was a major part of the settling of the United States West due to the extent of territory accessible by the river system. The Lewis and Clark expedition used St. Louis as a supply depot and as a repository of the survey work done. It was pure geography that made St. Louis important. Even the street names reveal the intersection of cultures – Native American, French, & US state names.

The first bridge over the Mississippi River in the area, the Eads Bridge, was the longest arch bridge in the world, using true steel for the first time in a major project. It was completed in 1874, but is not shown on the map. This speaks to the time element involved in gathering information for the atlas, the data sometimes taking as long as 10 years for a publication of this magnitude.

The St. Louis general strike of 1877 is generally accepted as the first in the country. It branched from the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, which began in West Virginia in response to the cutting of wages. Organized largely by the Knights of Labor and the Marxist-leaning Workingmen’s Party, the strike led about 500 people across the river as an act of solidarity. In all almost one thousand workers went on strike. The protest soon transformed from the disgruntlement of a couple hundred railroad workers to thousands of workers in several industries for an eight-hour day and ban on child labor. The strike was an effective, bloodless takeover by dissatisfied commerce and transportation workers. An elective committee was created to command the strike and continued to gain momentum with newsboys, boatmen, bakers, and many more joining the ranks. The general strike of St. Louis ended sadly when a couple thousand federal troops and special police killed about eighteen people in skirmishes around the city.

Archival print from high-resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eads_Bridge

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1884 Maine – City of Portland-Harbor

 

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Eighteen years after the Great Fire destroyed much of the City of Portland. See what the waterfront looks like with over forty wharves, sugar refineries, foundries and millwork factories.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 30″ Giclee print @$ 49.95

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1887 Maine – Mt. Desert Island

 

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This 1887 Maine map is the publishers date from Colby and Stuart. This is a reproduction that can only be seen clearly in full size. The image is somewhat darker than the finished prints but the overall color is age toned and perfect.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 43″ x 52″

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1906 Casco Bay, Maine – Walker Birds Eye View

 

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When summer tourists would come with their families and spend months here, and you could take the trolley to Lewiston or Old Orchard Beach for dancing or enjoy a trip to the Spa at Underwood Springs in Falmouth. This Walker Bird’s Eye View from 1906 is a very warm summer image of Casco Bay, Maine. Taken from a very high resolution scan,this giclee print on acid free heavyweight paper is a lasting treasure. Framing is available, as is local delivery.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 24″ x 34″

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1909 Maine – Portland Railroad Company

 

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Walker. A beautiful reproduction giclee print of Maine showing Casco Bay, Saco Bay, Old Orchard Beach, Cape Elizabeth/South Portland (partially obscured by “Portland RR medallion”) Taken from a very high resolution scan. Beautiful framed.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 22″ x 36″ 

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1909 Summer Resorts, Boston and Maine RR

 

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1909 Summer Resorts-Boston and Maine Railroad. Moosehead Lake, the Allagash, there are hundreds of spots on this map where the Boston and Maine Railroads could take you to fish, hunt or just relax. You can find most of them today, but the rails are mostly rust.

This is one of our favorite maps. The graphic quality of the color and fonts evokes the era when one could get on a train in Manhattan, and connect eventually to narrow gauge railroads going to very remote “Summer Resorts”.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 22″ x 24″

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1917 Mount Kineo Maine Fire Tower Map Colored

 

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1917 Mount Kineo Maine Fire Tower Map is one of a hundred or so maps that were used by Fire Wardens in the State of Maine to assist in pinpointing the exact location of smoke indicating a beginning forest fire. The maps used in the Maine Fire Towers were positioned flat on the plane of the map table, with the views oriented accurately toward the mountains on the horizon line. An instrument like a telescope/surveyor’s transit called an “Alidade” that rotated a full 360 degrees was used to calculate a very precise sighting. That information was generally confirmed by triangulation with another Tower within sight of the smoke. Crews could then be dispatched to put out the blaze. This method makes use of elementary geometry, but the accuracy of the alidade and the amount of work to collect the data for the maps and execute them constitute sophisticated endeavors.  This image is the original with a ” blue” band for the horizon view. The hand coloring of the land map inner part of the circle was done by John R. Barrows of Galeyrie.

 

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan: 24″ x 24″

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