1874 Mitchell Atlas of the World – Mexico, West Indies

 

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From the 1874 Mitchell World Atlas. A beautiful hand colored map of Mexico, Central America, The West Indies, Jamaica, the Sandwich Islands, Windward Islands and the Panama "Railroad". Villages of Mexico; Zacatecas, Manzanilla, La Baraca,Tampico, Rio Verde, Tulancingo, Llanos, Cinagua. In searching these maps of the 1874 Mitchell Atlas please note number of "early" names and the spelling of same as in the village of Guanaxuato is today Guanajuato. A hand colored map from 140 years ago reproduced faithfully on heavyweight archival stock. An insightful gift.

Since its discovery in the late fifteenth century, Cuba was considered the "pearl" of the Spanish Empire. The Ten Years' War in Cuba was sparked by an uprising against Spanish rule by Cuban rebels in 1868. The uprising consisted of a Cuban sugar mill owner, Carlos Manuel de Céspedes, and his followers proclaiming Cuba's independence from Spain. Thus began the first of three liberation wars. The other two took place after 1878, when the Ten Years' War ended. These were the Litter War, lasting two years, and the Cuban War of Independence, a three years war. The final three months of the War of Independence escalated into the Spanish-American War.

Mexico was on the tumultuous road to a revolution during the 1870s. In 1877, there was a revolt, after which Porfirio Díaz took control. He essentially ruled as a dictator until the early twentieth century. Mexico underwent significant commercial and economic development. This was largely aided by Díaz's encouragement of foreign investment. The modernizing reforms he made turned Mexico City into a bustling capital. However, the reforms for the most party long benefited the wealthy and did little to change the lives of the lower classes. The discontent this bred would later lead to a revolution.

Since its discovery in the late fifteenth century, Cuba was considered the "pearl" of the Spanish Empire. The Ten Years' War in Cuba was sparked by an uprising against Spanish rule by Cuban rebels in 1868. The uprising consisted of a Cuban sugar mill owner, Carlos Manuel de Céspedes, and his followers proclaiming Cuba's independence from Spain. Thus began the first of three liberation wars. The other two took place after 1878, when the Ten Years' War ended. These were the Litter War, lasting two years, and the Cuban War of Independence, a three years war. The final three months of the War of Independence escalated into the Spanish-American War.

Mexico was on the tumultuous road to a revolution during the 1870s. In 1877, there was a revolt, after which Porfirio Díaz took control. He essentially ruled as a dictator until the early twentieth century. Mexico underwent significant commercial and economic development. This was largely aided by Díaz's encouragement of foreign investment. The modernizing reforms he made turned Mexico City into a bustling capital. However, the reforms for the most party long benefited the wealthy and did little to change the lives of the lower classes. The discontent this bred would later lead to a revolution.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 24" x 15"

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