Hand Colored Maps

Hand Colored Category
Most of these maps have been hand colored in house by Galeyrie owner, John R Barrows. Hand coloring makes maps more clearly readable, and more aesthetically appealing. Please note that the originals are generally not for sale. What we are offering are archival reproductions of the original hand coloring.

1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Eastern Hemisphere

 

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The graphic depiction of “longest rivers and tallest mountains” on this map of the Eastern Hemisphere is typical of the quality of the maps in this Atlas.Hand colored. The fine art reproductions look great with simple framing and make unique and thoughtful gifts for almost all ages.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Europe Political

 

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From the Mitchell Atlas of the World 1874. A wonderful map of Europe from 140 years ago.

Victorian womanhood in Great Britain was characterized by a domestic and helpless nature. Women’s confinement to the home was not voluntary, because most legal systems in the West stripped them of their property rights once they married.” Women were expected to be submissive to their husbands. They were considered inferior to the men, and therefore expected to listen to the master of the house. Several facts of Victorian womanhood were masked by society. The women had to contribute to support their families, and many were quite skilled. Many women also took their primary identity from the money they earned for their family’s well being. Ideal qualities of a woman included her being “clean, hard working, economical, and modest, in a way she performs the same miracle as our divine redeemer, converting hard rocks into bread” (A Fictional Depiction of Womanhood).

The Franco-Prussian War began in 1870 and ended a year later. The conflict pitted the French Empire and Kingdom of Prussia against one another. The North German Confederation aided Prussia. Tension had been rising due to past conflicts, failures, and resentment. Prussia and the German States used industrial technology to their advantage. The war ended with the victory of Prussia and its allies. A primary consequence of the war was the unification of Germany into an empire in its own right. Otto von Bismarck ruled the nation under an authoritarian constitution that elected a national parliament, but gave the Kaiser extensive powers. The now unified industrializing nation shifted the balance of power in Europe. The fight brought an end to second empire France. Post-war tension between the two sides is considered a precursor to World War I.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Florida

 

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This State Map of Florida from the 1874 Mitchell Atlas of the World shows a hand-colored rendering of the State with a signature Mitchell Grape and Vine border.

The 1760s brought bands of Creek peoples to Florida. They became known as Seminoles, a name given by the Spanish for their outsider status. The Seminoles became increasingly autonomous from other Creek groups, eventually establishing their own unique identity. In the late 18th century, their numbers increased with free blacks and escaped slaves setting near and paying tribute to Seminole settlements.

During the colonial years, the Seminole maintained good terms with the Spanish and British. The Spanish Empire’s gradual decline allowed the Seminoles to settle more deeply into the state. In 1819, by terms of the Adams-Onís Treaty, Spain ceded Florida to the United States in exchange for $5 million and the American renunciation of any claims on Texas that they might have from the Louisiana Purchase.  The tribe established a dynasty that lasted past the removal of Seminoles by U.S. forces to Oklahoma preceding the Second Seminole War, 1835 to 1842. The dynasty survived through the Civil War, after which the federal government began interfering with the tribal government and supporting its own candidate for chief.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – France, Spain, Portugal

 

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From the Mitchell 1874 Atlas of the World- France Spain Portugal. A beautifully hand colored map from 140 years ago.

The Franco-Prussian War began in 1870 and ended a year later. The conflict pitted the French Empire and Kingdom of Prussia against one another. The North German Confederation aided Prussia. Tension had been rising due to past conflicts, failures, and resentment. Prussia and the German States used industrial technology to their advantage. The war ended with the victory of Prussia and its allies. A primary consequence of the war was the unification of Germany into an empire in its own right. Otto von Bismarck ruled the nation under an authoritarian constitution that elected a national parliament, but gave the Kaiser extensive powers. The now unified industrializing nation shifted the balance of power in Europe. Post-war tension between the two sides is considered a precursor to World War I.

A constitutional crisis occurred in 1877 in the French Third Republic. It involved the distribution of power between the president and legislature. When the Royalist President MacMahon dismissed the Republican Prime Minister Simon, parliament refused to support the new government. MacMahon resolved to dissolve the parliament. Elections were conducted, and an overwhelming victory was brought for the Republicans. Ultimately the interpretation of the 1875 Constitution as a parliamentary system triumphed over a presidential system. This put an end to hopes of a monarchist revival by the Royalist movement and was crucial to the longevity of the Third Republic.

Since its discovery in the late fifteenth century, Cuba was considered the “pearl” of the Spanish Empire. The Ten Years’ War in Cuba was sparked by an uprising against Spanish rule by Cuban rebels in 1868. The uprising consisted of a Cuban sugar mill owner, Carlos Manuel de Céspedes, and his followers proclaiming Cuba’s independence from Spain. Thus began the first of three liberation wars. The other two took place after 1878, when the Ten Years’ War ended. These were the Litter War, lasting two years, and the Cuban War of Independence, a three years war. The final three months of the War of Independence escalated into the Spanish-American War.

In Portugal, the Liberal Wars spanned from 1828 to 1834 as a civil war. The fight was between progressive constitutionalists and authoritarian absolutists in Portugal over royal succession. The liberals fought under Pedro IV, while the absolutists fought under Dom Miguel, Pedro’s brother. The liberals supported a constitutional monarchy and worked to secure the throne for Pedro’s daughter Dona Maria II. The absolutists believed it was Miguel’s divine right to rule. Pedro attempted to reconcile the two sides through a new constitution, allowing both factions a role in the government. The absolutist party of landowners and the Church was not satisfied and continued to fight for Miguel. The party continued to disregard Pedro as ruler until the Cortes of 1828 proclaimed Miguel as absolute ruler, thus nullifying the Constitutional Charter. A rebellion was unearthed. Miguel immediately suppressed the liberal rebellions. Five years of repression followed. The Battle of Asseiceira was the last and decisive engagement in the Civil War. A peace was declared under a concession by which Miguel renounced all claims to the throne and was exiled. Pedro restored the Constitutional Charter and was once again named ruler.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Illinois

 

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From the Mitchell Atlas of the World, this State of Illinois map of 1874 is a hand colored beauty showing the incredible development of the agricultural and manufacturing industries via the railroad network. An intuitive gift.

Starved Rock looms 130 feet above the Illinois River, and stands as the city’s greatest natural landmark. Its name dates back to the 18th century. A desperate band of Illinois Native Americans sought refuge on top of the rock to escape a group of Pottawatomie Indians, who were revenging their Chief Pontiac’s murder in 1769. The tribe soon found itself stranded on the rock without provisions and ultimately died of starvation. It still isn’t know today whether this siege actually occurred, or if it was merely a myth. 

The fifteen minute long Battle of Fort Dearborn took place on August 15, 1812 between the American troops and Potawatomi Indians. It occurred in what is now the city of Chicago during the War of 1812. The brief conflict ended in total Native victory. The Fort of ultimately burned down and the surviving soldiers subsequently taken captive. This battle convinced the government and settlers once and for all that all Native Americans must be removed from the land and placed far away from the settlement. This was a prime example of the Natives “winning the battle but losing the war.”

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Iowa and Missouri

 

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From the Mitchell Atlas of the World.1874,this map of Iowa and Missouri is as close to a work of map-making art as any I have seen. Hand colored with the grape and vine border. Reproduction prints are fine art quality.

The Louisiana Purchase took place in 1803 when the United States acquired France’s claim to the Louisiana territory. The territory encompassed the present day states of Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska. Parts of Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, New Mexico, Texas, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and Louisiana were also included. America paid about $15 million for the land, which would total up to about $230 million in today’s dollars. France had controlled this land from 1699 to 1762, when it gave the land to its ally, Spain. The territory was recaptured under Napoleon Bonaparte in 1800 in the hope of building an empire in North America. With an impending war with Britain and violent slave war in Haiti, Napoleon abandoned these plans and sold the land overnight to the Americans. President Thomas Jefferson presided over the purchase, without the knowledge or consent of Congress. The purchase was agreed to be unconstitutional. Jefferson, however, was pardoned, as the purchase proved incredibly advantageous for the new nation.

On December 16, 1811, a series of extremely powerful earthquakes hit the eastern United States in what is now Missouri. Church bells all the way in Boston, Massachusetts and Toronto were reported to ring, while sidewalks cracked and broke in Washington, D.C.. Interestingly, the earthquakes helped bring justice to a man called George Lewis, who was murdered on the same night. Lewis, also known as Slave George, was killed by two of Thomas Jefferson’s nephews, Lilburn and Isham Lewis. They had been Lewis’ slave owner and had killed him with an axe in front of the other slaves. The earthquake interrupted their plan to burn his remains, so the murderers instead put the body in a chimney. If the chimney had not collapsed in two quakes that took place later on in January and February. The Lewis’ were investigated, arrested, and charged. Lilburn committed suicide, while Isham escaped from jail and is suspected to have died in the War of 1812.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Kansas and Nebraska

 

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A County and Township map of 1874 from the Mitchell World Atlas. This hand colored map of Nebraska and Kansas is highly detailed.
A “double page” plate in original size of 15″x24″,this is a very high quality reproduction print.A beautiful and thoughtful gift. $57.95 includes shipping charges to USA and Canada.

The Louisiana Purchase took place in 1803 when the United States acquired France’s claim to the Louisiana territory. The territory encompassed the present day states of Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska. Parts of Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, New Mexico, Texas, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and Louisiana were also included. America paid about $15 million for the land, which would total up to about $230 million in today’s dollars. France had controlled this land from 1699 to 1762, when it gave the land to its ally, Spain. The territory was recaptured under Napoleon Bonaparte in 1800 in the hope of building an empire in North America. With an impending war with Britain and violent slave war in Haiti, Napoleon abandoned these plans and sold the land overnight to the Americans. President Thomas Jefferson presided over the purchase, without the knowledge or consent of Congress. The purchase was agreed to be unconstitutional. Jefferson, however, was pardoned, as the purchase proved incredibly advantageous for the new nation.

Major Stephen H. Long was an American army explorer who embarked on a scientific expedition in the Great Plains area, a region which encompasses the state of Nebraska. Long is quoted to have deems the Land from Nebraska to Oklahoma “unfit for cultivation and of course inhabitable by a people depending upon agriculture.” He dubbed the land the “Great Desert.” Given the technology of the time, Long’s statement proved accurate. The land lacked timber, proper soil, adequate access to water, and was prone for very hard winters. The hostile Natives that inhabited the so called desert proved difficult to communicate with. Ironically however, the Native American tribes had been surviving there for centuries. Even more interestingly, by the end of the 19th century, the “Great Desert” became America’s breadbasket.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 15″ x 24″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Mass, Connecticut, R. Island

 

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From the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island. A beautiful reproduction of a hand colored original. A thoughtful gift.

The Boston Massacre consisted of British redcoats slaughtered five civilian men and killing six others. It took place in 1770 and helped spark the rebellion in some of the British American colonies, eventually leading to the American Revolutionary War. The British increase in troops in Boston led to an increase in tension that erupted into brawls between soldiers and civilians. After being threatened by a mob, the troops fired, killing five civilians and injuring eleven. Crispus Attucks, a decedent of the Wampanoag tribe and Africa, was a solider in the American Revolution. He was the first individual shot to death by the British redcoats during the Boston Massacre. Attucks has been called the first martyr of the revolution. Little is actually known about this man, including the extent of his participation in the revolutionary acts. He did, however, become an icon of the anti-slavery movement as an example of the first black hero of the American Revolution.

Connecticut Plan, also known as the Great Compromise, was a compromise between the Virginia and New Jersey Plans. It was an agreement reached between large and small states during the Constitutional Convention of 1787.  It kept the bicameral legislature of the Virginian Plan, with one branch’s representation based on population and the other equal for each state. Created by Roger Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth, the plan established three branches of government, the legislative, executive, and judicial.

Anne Hutchinson was a Puritan residing in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New Netherlands in the early seventeenth century. She became the leader of a dissident church discussion group, holding Bible meetings for women, though men were quickly drawn in as well. She later went beyond Bible study to declare her own theological interpretations of sermons. Certain interpretations of hers offended colony leadership and they soon accused Hutchinson of practicing antinomianism. Her controversial interpretations led to a trial before a jury of officials and clergy and her banishment from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Hutchinson was a key figure in the study of the development of religious freedom in England’s American colonies and the history of women in ministry.

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – N.W. America: Alaska

 

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From the 1874 Atlas of the World by Augustus Mitchell in it’s original size of 12″x15″ and beautifully hand colored, the Northwest of America and Alaska.

The Klondike Gold Rush marched through the state of Washington between 1897 and 1900. It consisted of the migration of about 100,000 gold prospectors to the Canadian Klondike region of Yukon. The migration was particularly heavy when news of the gold discovery reached Seattle and San Francisco, triggering what would be described as a “stampede.” People all over the world traveled to Alaska and Canada in hopes of striking gold and making a fortune. This journey proved incredibly difficult and eliminated many of the prospectors. A wealth of tales were generated, both fictional and non-fictional, about the hardships and later, the conditions, the people endured. As little as 30,000 were thought to have reached their destination. The majority of these survivors, however, failed to strike gold. Only about 4,000 truly succeeded. More gold was discovered a year later, however, as newspapers fueled nation-wide hysteria at the prospect of more gold. Again, the marchers found themselves disappointed and exhausted. Mining proved a draining task, both to the people’s money supplies and bodies. The impact of the gold rush on the Native peoples is not to be overlooked. At first, many tribes prospered from their work as guides, packers, and vendors. The environmental damage of the mining, however proved too much. Resources destroyed, the peoples eventually had to resort to government aid. Many of the people who made the journey to the North still reside there today. New visitors also make the trek, ready to do whatever it takes to strike gold.

Archival print from high-resolution scan.  12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware

 

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From the 1874 Mitchell Atlas of the World. This hand-colored plate shows the states of New Jersey, Maryland and Delaware in very fine detail.

For the first two thirds of the 20th century, Camden, New Jersey was home to two phonograph and phonograph recording companies, one being RCA Victor, which was the world’s largest manufacturer of these products. RCA Victor contained one of the first commercial recording studios in the nation. Enrico Caruso, an acclaimed Italian tenor, was one of the first to record there. For two years during the 1940s, the company was seriously impacted by the recording ban placed by the American Federation of Musicians. Nearly all union musicians were unable to record. After that, the recording studio continued into modern times, acquiring artists such as Latin Pop sensation Shakira, Christina Aguilera, and the Dave Matthews Band.

In Maryland, a series of Baltimore riots in 1856 proved to be the worst Know-Nothing rampaging of their era. The Know Nothing movement was an American political movement that promised to purify the nation’s politics by limiting or ending immigrant influence. During the 1850s, street tensions escalated as neighborhood gangs became more involved in party politics. Know Nothing Mayor Samuel Hinks accurately predicted the violence that occurred during the October municipal election. Several killings and injuries occurred throughout the month, while violence escalated further during the November presidential election. The partisans involved were extremely well-known fighting men with strong connections to street violence. Much of the violence was well-organized and planned, as opposed to being purely spontaneous. Know-Nothing candidate Thomas Swann was elected Mayor of Baltimore during the violence and a heavily disputed ballot.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – New York State

 

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This is an archival reproduction giclee print of a beautiful map of New York State. Originally from the Mitchell Atlas of the World. Lucia pigments and Enhanced Matte heavyweight paper ( 192 GSM ) make this map a substantial value.

George Clinton held the office of Governor of New York forth longest number of years in United States history. He began his 21 years of service in 1777 as the state’s first governor, served until 1795, and then again served for three years from 1801 to 1804. Clinton then moved on to serve as Vice President from 1805 to 1812 for Thomas Jefferson and then again for James Madison. He was a passionate patriot who signed the Declaration of Independence and defended his state as brigadier general during the Revolutionary War early in his life. He maintained an intense hatred for the Tories and slyly kept taxes down by seizing and selling Tory estates. Although he was a good friend and supporter of President Washington, he did not let this effect his politics. Clinton refused to support the Constitution until the Bill of Rights was added. 

Ranking third in public assembly building fires, the catastrophic Brooklyn Theater Fire of 1876 claimed just under 300 lives. A common grave was constructed for 103 unidentified victims. The fatalities centered primarily around the family circle, rows of inexpensive seating positioned high in the theater. Exit from the gallery, which held some 400 people, was in the form of a single stairwell, which sustained extreme temperatures and suffocating smoke early in the disaster. The small stairwell was immediately jammed with people, cutting off the escape of the majority of  occupants. Those remaining in the gallery rapidly succumbed to smoke inhalation and died. The fire had taken place near the start of the performance, a production of The Two Orphans. A gas light ignited some extra scenery stored behind the stage. The fire was only discovered midway through the play after it had spread sufficiently. Fire raged through the night, completely destroying the building.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – North and South Carolina

 

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From the 1874 Mitchell Atlas of the World.This beautifully hand-colored map of North Carolina and South Carolina will make a wonderful and thoughtful gift.Insets of Charleston and Charleston Harbor.

Henry Berry Lowrie, who is viewed by some as a sort of Robin Hood figure, led a gang of rebels in North Carolina during the Civil War. The Lumbee and Tuscarora tribes grew to consider Lowrie an ancestor and pioneer in their civil rights battle. The gang’s violence began in order to revenge the unjust murders of his father and brother. The group embarked on a series of robberies and murders against the white establishment in 1866 and continued this rebellion until 1872. These white people had excluded him and his family from military service due to their status as free men of color, also known as free blacks. Lowrie’s troop became a powerful opposing force to the conservative Democratic power structure of white supremacy. Much of this was done through the robbery and slaughtering of the establishment’s associates. In 1872, Lowrie robbed the local sheriff of more than $28,000 and disappeared. His death remains largely disputed, as sightings were reported several years after his disappearance. Without their leader, the gang was almost totally annihilated by the establishment. Although Lowrie and his family appeared to be of African descent, they disdained this idea and instead claimed to be decedents of the Tuscarora Indians. Lowrie is thus portrayed as a hero for the Natives, flouting white supremacy by fighting for his people and defending the downtrodden.

In 1774, Francis Salvador of South Carolina became the first Jew elected to office in the United States. He descended from a prominent Jewish family who had been quite active in the administration. Salvador’s grandfather was inflection in the courageous transport of 42 Jewish colonists to Georgia despite the colony’s prohibition against Jewish settlers. The family had then purchased land in South Carolina, but returned to their settlement in London. It wasn’t until the Lisbon earthquake of 1755 destroyed all the family’s property that Salvador resolve to return to South Carolina and attempt to rebuild his family’s fortune. The year he arrived, he won a seat in the South Carolina General Assembly. Salvador was elected to the Provincial Congress in 1774, where he advocated fervently for independence. On the first of July, Salvdor rode 30 miles on horseback to warn the settlers of a Cherokee attack, thus earning him the name “Southern Paul Revere.” Soon after, Salvador was brutally murdered by a group of Cherokees. He was killed leading a militia group, and thus became the first Jewish soldier killed in the War for Independence. He died before hearing that the Continental Congress in Philadelphia had taken his advice and chosen to vote for independence.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Nova Scotia and New Brunswick

 

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The Maritimes. Nova Scotia and New Brunswick from the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874, this plate is a reproduction from a very high resolution scan. A Giclee print on heavy watercolor paper.

The Great Upheaval of 1755 was the forced expulsion of the Acadian people by the British from the Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and part of Maine. The removal took place during the French and Indian War. It lasted 9 years as part of the British military campaign against New France. The British first deported the Acadians, who were the French colonists settled in what was then Acadia, to the Thirteen Colonies. After 1758, they began deporting the settlers back to France. All in all, about 11,500 were deported. When the British first acquired the territory in 1710, a portion of the Acadians had attempted a revolt. Soon, the British saw a need to eliminate any future military threat and without making distinctions between those who had remained neutral and those who had rebelled, the British governor ordered all people to be expelled. The British seized Acadian farms, goods, and livestock. They ransacked and destroyed homesteads as precautions, incase the Acadians managed to return. Ultimately, the British would allow Acadians to return, provided they take an oath of allegiance. But, with their homesteads ruined, the Acadians were forced into the primarily unsettled areas of today’s New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Ohio and Indiana

 

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Ohio and Indiana from the 1874 Mitchell World Atlas. These maps are beautiful framed and make wonderful and thoughtful gifts.

The Cincinnati Riots of 1884, which would become some of the most destructive in American history, were instigated by public outrage over a jury decision. The public fought for the return of a manslaughter verdict in a clear case of murder. A young German and his accomplice robbed and murdered their employer, who was a livery stable owner. Despite having testimonies from seven different people claiming the man confessed his crime to them, the German was sentenced to only 20 years in prison. The judge himself dubbed the verdict “a damned outrage.”  The protest escalated until a mob ventured to find and lynch the perpetrator themselves. Over 50 people died in the violence that followed and the Cincinnati courthouse was left destroyed. Cincinnati in the 80s was a tough industrial city with a rising crime rate. This was party due to dissatisfaction with labor conditions and was not helped by the corrupt political system. As the number of troops in Cincinnati grew, the riots slowly calmed down. The murdered served his rightful sentence in jail, while the political bosses whose influence played a large part in the unjust verdict stepped down.

Race relations in Indianapolis began to deteriorate during the 20th century. Although it had been one of the few states where no rioting took place following Martin Luther King’s assassination, the passage of Unigov in 1970 further isolated the middle class from the city’s growing African American community. Unigov was the name adopted by the city for its consolidated city-county government. Although the state of Indiana abolished segregated schools before the Brown vs. Board of Education decision, the court ordered decision of desegregated school busing proved quite controversial. In the following years, the city experienced a great deal of urban decay and white flight.  In wake of this, the following decades ushered in periods of planning and revitalization for the city’s urban core.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Ontario

 

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Bordered by three immense lakes, Huron, Erie and Ontario, this County map of Ontario is from the 1874 Mitchell World Atlas. Hand colored and reproduced here in original size of 12″x15″ archivally printed on acid free paper.

In Ontario, there was a nineteenth century shift of religious power from the Tory elite to the middle class merchants and professionals. The leadership of the Anglican Church had once been unquestioned, partly due to the intimate networks of patron client relations, faded gradually. Their power declined with the introduction of more modern ideals based on merit. By the 1870s, the new middle class was firmly in control and the old elite had all but vanished.

Beginning in the late 1870s, the Ontario Woman’s Christian Temperance Union banded together under the objective of incorporating “scientific temperance” in the schools’ curricula. This study reinforced moralistic temperance messages with the study of anatomy. When this proved unsuccessful, the Union moved to dry up Ontario through government action. This succeeded in eliminating alcohol in many rural areas and towns, but not in the larger cities. The sale and consumption of liquor, wine, and beer today are still controlled by the government, though to a lesser extent. This ensured strict community standards and the upholding of revenue generation from the alcohol.

The year 1813 brought the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812. A year before, when the war broke out, the British had immediately leaped to seize control of the Lake. But in 1813, the United States Navy defeated and captured the British Royal Navy, ensuring American control of the lake for the rest of the war. This in turn allowed the American force to recover Detroit and win the Battle of the Thames (Ontario). The Battle proved one of the biggest naval conflicts of the war.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana

 

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From the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874, Oregon Washington Utah Montana, hand colored, showing the political and geographic features of the American Northwest during the period of Westward Expansion & homesteading.

The Klondike Gold Rush marched through the state of Washington between 1896 and 1899. It consisted of the migration of about 100,000 gold prospectors to the Canadian Klondike region of Yukon. The migration was particularly heavy when news of the gold discovery reached Seattle and San Francisco, triggering what would be described as a “stampede.” This journey proved incredibly difficult and eliminated many of the prospectors. As little as 30,000 were thought to have reached their destination. The majority of these survivors, however, failed to strike gold. Only about 4,000 truly succeeded. More gold was discovered a year later, however, as newspapers fueled nation-wide hysteria at the prospect of more gold. Again, the marchers found themselves disappointed and exhausted. Mining proved a draining task, both to the people’s money supplies and bodies. The impact of the gold rush on the Native peoples is not to be overlooked. At first, many tribes prospered from their work as guides, packers, and vendors. The environmental damage of the mining, however proved too much. Resources destroyed, the peoples eventually had to resort to government aid.

 

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Palestine, the Holy Land

 

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From the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874, hand colored map of the Holy Land, Palestine. This shows Palestine before the creation of the modern Israeli state, at the beginning of the Zionist movement.

Zionism was a Jewish nationalist movement created by Theodor Herzl in the late 1800s. Herzl was an Austrian journalist who regarded the assimilation of Jewish people as desirable, but impossible due to anti-Semitism. He argued that if Jews were forced to form a nation, they could lead a ordinary existence. The Zionist goal was the creation of a Jewish national state in Palestine, the ancient homeland of the Jewish people. This movement to create a Jewish state was further intensified after the Holocaust. The Zionists attained their goal in 1948 with the creation of Israel. The movement exists today and works to support Israel and the Jewish people. This is the first instance in history where a nation has been reestablished after such a long period of existence as a Diaspora.

In 1874, Jerusalem gained a special administrative status. It was under direct rule of Istanbul having been under the authority (with brief exceptions) of the Ottoman or Islamic Empire since the seventh century. To this day, the city is not internationally recognized as the capital of Israel, though many believe it to be so. The city is located 15 miles west of the Dead Sea. This map, as well as all others up until 1949, don’t show the state of Israel.

Israel and Palestine’s engagement in something quite similar to all-out war is not without a colorful past. Palestinian effort to rid themselves of Israeli control has escalated significantly in the past fifteen years. The fight is one of multiple key issues: mutual recognition, borders, security, water rights, control of Jerusalem, the Palestinian freedom movement, and more. The often brutal violence has promoted international action.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Pennsylvania

 

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From the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874. Hand colored with the signature Mitchell grapevine border.

The first official World’s Fair (a general term for large public exhibitions which vary greatly around the world) of the United States took place in 1876 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from May to November. The fair celebrated the centennial of the Declaration of Independence’s signing. It was officially titled the International Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures and Products of Soil and Mine, but was referred to as the Centennial International Exhibition. The exhibition attracted about 10 million visitors, about 20 percent of the United State’s population at the time. Several consumer products were first displayed in this exhibition, including Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone and Heinz Ketchup. The right arm and torch of the Statue of Liberty were showcased at the fair as a money raising strategy. For 50 cents, visitors could climb the ladder to the balcony. The money raised went to completing the remainder of the statue.

This hand colored map from that year shows the political and geographical features of the state. Note the curvature of the mountains in the center of the state.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 15″ x 24″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Peru, Venezuela, Ecuador

 

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South America: Peru Venezuela Ecuador. From the 1874 Mitchell Atlas of the World. This beautiful hand colored map is a gift of history.

In May of 1874, the Congress of Venezuela enacted a new constitution. It was similar to its predecessor in most aspects, but made a few modifications. Voters were now forced to sign a pledge and presidential reelection was prohibited.

An armed rebellion known as the Revolution of the Choir took place in October of 1874. It worked to overthrow the government of President Antonio Leocadio Guzmán Blanco, who founded Venezuela’s Liberal Party and brought the civil wars to an end. The autocratic nature of his regimes contradicted with the economic and legal reforms he introduced. The Revolution did not succeed. However, it demonstrated the solidity of Guzmán’s government and the control he had on regional warlords. Guzmán moved on to attract foreign investment, modernize infrastructure, and develop agriculture and education in Venezuela. Guzmán also attempted to introduce French social mores, thus enhancing the rift with Imperial Spain. Venezuela had served as no more than a defensive frontier during the three centuries of Spanish rule, as it did not have rich mineral deposits or dense population for labor exploitation. This nation’s small population and vulnerable coastline put their hope for autonomy at risk of the threats capitalism provided. Guzmán thus epitomized the trend toward national and economic integration during his rule.

The rubber boom began in Peru during the 1870s. Optimum conditions include heavy year round rainfall, temperature ranges of about 68°F to 93°F, high humidity, steady, bright sunshine, and an absence of strong winds. All of which are present in Peru. The associated need for a great workforce effected the indigenous population of the Amazon significantly. Natural rubber was made a desirable commodity by the Industrial Revolution. It created both wealth and a desire to invest in Peru and the surrounding Amazonian countries.

President Gabriel García Moreno ruled over Ecuador during the 60s and 70s. He was known for his conservatism, devotion to Catholicism, opposition to corruption, and leading role in science and higher education within Latin America. Moreno was said to have economically and agriculturally advanced Ecuador during his rule. He was assassinated in 1875.

Archival reproduction print from a high resolution scan. 24″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Plan of Baltimore

 

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A plan of Baltimore, Maryland from the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874.The map shows details of important buildings including some footprints, as well as the railroads of 1874. A beautifully hand colored piece with the signature grape and vine border.

A series of Baltimore riots in 1856 proved to be the worst Know-Nothing rampaging of their era. The Know Nothing movement was an American political movement that promised to purify the nation’s politics by limiting or ending immigrant influence. During the 1850s, street tensions escalated as neighborhood gangs became more involved in party politics. Know Nothing Mayor Samuel Hinks accurately predicted the violence that occurred during the October municipal election. Several killings and injuries occurred throughout the month, while violence escalated further during the November presidential election. The partisans involved were extremely well-known fighting men with strong connections to street violence. Much of the violence was well-organized and planned, as opposed to being purely spontaneous. Know-Nothing candidate Thomas Swann was elected Mayor of Baltimore during the violence and a heavily disputed ballot.

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Plan of Washington

 

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This Plan of Washington DC is from the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874, less than 10 years after the end of the Civil War, and before the formation of the District of Columbia.  Many important buildings are marked on the map, and for some their footprints are shown. A very finely detailed, hand colored map. A beautiful gift.

In 1884, the Washington Monument was completed. It was built in commemoration of the President George Washington. The structure was created to represent the man himself, standing tall and magnificent over all, however unadorned. Constructed of marble, granite, and bluestone gneise, it stands as the world’s tallest stone structure at 556 feet. The contributing marble was gathered mostly from the bordering state of Maryland. Construction began in 1848. A 23 year hiatus in construction occurred for various reasons, including lack of funds and the American Civil War. The total cost for its construction added up to nearly two million dollars. Talk about building such a monument while Washington was still in office had surfaced, but he brushed it aside, claiming the money could be put to better use.

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Prussia and German States

 

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Prussia, Bavaria, the German States in this beautiful and richly hand colored map from the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874.

The Franco-Prussian War began in 1870 and ended a year later. The conflict pitted the French Empire and Kingdom of Prussia against one another. The North German Confederation aided Prussia. Tension had been rising due to past conflicts, failures, and resentment. Prussia and the German States used industrial technology to their advantage. The war ended with the victory of Prussia and its allies. A primary consequence of the war was the unification of Germany into an empire in its own right. Otto von Bismarck ruled the nation under an authoritarian constitution that elected a national parliament, but gave the Kaiser extensive powers. The now unified industrializing nation shifted the balance of power in Europe. Post-war tension between the two sides is considered a precursor to World War I.

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Quebec

 

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A beautiful County map of Quebec from the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874. A thoughtful gift for the love of history.

The Continental Army invaded Canada in the Battle of Quebec in 1775. The goal of the invasion was to gain control of Quebec and convince the people to join the revolution. This was the first major military initiative by the newly formed army. The army fought against British defenders of Quebec and proved the first major defeat for the Americans. A high price was paid through the death of General Richard Montgomery, the wounding of Benedict Arnold, and more than 400 American troops taken prisoner. In the battle and following siege, French speaking Canadians played an active part on both sides. Local residents provided the Continental Army with supplies. On the other side, the city’s defenders included a locally raised militia. A number of Canadian supporters accompanied the Americans when they retreated. The remaining supporters were punished by the British when they re-established control.

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Russia in Europe, Sweden, Norway

 

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Russia in Europe; Sweden & Norway on this beautiful hand colored map from the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874.

The Russian-Turkish War began in 1877 and ended a year later. The conflict was between the Ottoman Empire and the Eastern Orthodox coalition, who were led by the Russian Empire. This divide is visible on the map as Russia’s western border. This map shows where the European and Islamic worlds came together.

The war originated from Balkan nationalism. Russian hopes for recovering land lost during the Crimean War and attempts to free Balkan nations from Ottoman rule were also contributing factors. Russia succeeded in claiming several provinces and Romania, Serbia, and Montenegro finally gained independence. This war caused a conflict between the International Red Cross (European) and Red Crescent (Islamic) Movement emblems. The cross was first accepted as the sole emblem for protection of military medical personnel, however during the war, the Ottomans felt it reminded them too much of the Crusades. So, they elected to use the Red Crescent instead. This ultimately became the symbol of the Red Crescent Movement in most Muslim countries. The division led to the Magen David Adom controversy, which resulted in yet another emblem.

In Russia, the Kazan demonstration of 1876 marked the appearance of the Land and Liberty. As it was illegal to criticize the Russian government, the group had been conducting its meetings in secret. The movement split on tactics and three years later, the People’s Will was formed, branching off of the Land and Liberty. The group advocated for violent action to achieve reform and planned to assassinate Alexander II. In 1881, they succeeded in murdering the Czar by throwing an explosive at his carriage. His death brought the end of hopes to reform the system from above. Alexander III, the new Czar, entered with renewed vigor.

From 1814 to 1905, Norway and Sweden were united. Sweden allowed Norway to keep its parliament, but both countries were ruled under one king. Industrialization and the large scale immigration to North America during the 1860s led Norway to eventually establish a parliamentary system of government in 1884. The union with Sweden was dissolved in 1905.

In Norway, cultural expression from the 1840s to the 1870s was dominated by romantic nationalism. Within this lay a heavy emphasis on the uniqueness of the nation’s nature and identity. The movement was characterized by nostalgia. Context can be provided by the nation’s four centuries as a Danish province and treatment as cultural backwater by the Danish absentee government. Norway’s partial independence with Sweden proved still too restricting and independence wasn’t gained until 1905. Romantic nationalism had a significant impact on national identity in Norway, even after it was overshadowed by other cultural movements.

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – South America

 

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A beautiful hand colored map of South America and (inset) New Granada from the Mitchell World Atlas of 1874. Our reproductions of this map and all the maps on this site are carefully printed from very high resolution scans.

The Paraguayan War, a conflict fought between Paraguay and the Triple Alliance of Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay, ended with the defeat of Paraguay in 1870. The war had caused more deaths proportionally to the number of soldiers than any other war in modern history. Up to 200 thousand people are said to have died because of the war. Paraguay took decades to recover from the chaos and population imbalance, as their male population was left devastated, caused by this conflict. The event helped bring an end to slavery in Brazil, moved its military to a important role internationally, and caused a terrible increase in public debt, which led to a reduction in the country’s growth. In Argentina, some say the war played a role in its consolidation as a nation-state.

The Spanish and Portuguese had forbidden the settlement of other European nations during their reign. The settlement thus began only after South American countries achieved independence. Uruguay, Chile, Brazil, and Argentina began actively recruiting colonists in the 1870s. Germans, Russians, Italians, and Portuguese began to immigrate to South America. Laws regarding health requirements were less stringent than they were in the United States. The German people were also attracted to the devotion to Catholicism in Brazil and Argentina. European settlers tended to settle in cities, localize their communities, and specialize in specific economic activities. Immigration to South America was much smaller than the masses that traveled to North America. This was mainly because of the less appealing tropical climate, limited free land, and political instability.

In 1875, Gabriel Garcia Moreno of Ecuador was assassinated, opening an age of anarchy. He is known for his conservatism, Catholic religious outlook, and contention with the liberals of Ecuador. Moreno had served two terms as president, and was elected for a third term. The Liberals considered this final election to be his death warrant. Had Moreno stopped with a few reforms, he might have had a different legacy. His unwavering religious fervor knew no boundaries. He ideally wished to create a near-theocratic state with indirect rule by the Vatican. Under his rule, only Roman Catholics were true citizens. He was ruled as a dictator, severely limited free speech and press and restricting Congress to the point that their only purpose were to approve his edicts. All in all, Moreno’s accomplishments were overshadowed by this religious fervor. He stabilized Ecuador’s economy, improved their international credit, encouraged foreign investment, made significant education reforms, and modernized agriculture.

By 1875, Brazil was providing about half of the world’s coffee. Ideal conditions for the cultivation of coffee include high elevation and a tropical climate, both present in parts of Brazil. Today, it still remains the world’s largest producer, making about a third of all coffee. The crop was first introduced during the 19th century. It was not native to the Americas and had to be planted. It reached its peak in 1920s, supplying 80 percent of the world’s coffee.

Archival reproduction print form a high resolution scan. 24″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – St.Louis

 

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A beautiful hand colored map of the City of St.Louis in 1874 from the Mitchell World Atlas of that year. The location of St. Louis was  significant since pre-Columbian times due to the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers just north of the city and that confluence’s effect on trade which continues to this day. At the time of the making of this map, St. Louis was a major part of the settling of the United States West due to the extent of territory accessible by the river system. The Lewis and Clark expedition used St. Louis as a supply depot and as a repository of the survey work done. It was pure geography that made St. Louis important. Even the street names reveal the intersection of cultures – Native American, French, & US state names.

The first bridge over the Mississippi River in the area, the Eads Bridge, was the longest arch bridge in the world, using true steel for the first time in a major project. It was completed in 1874, but is not shown on the map. This speaks to the time element involved in gathering information for the atlas, the data sometimes taking as long as 10 years for a publication of this magnitude.

The St. Louis general strike of 1877 is generally accepted as the first in the country. It branched from the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, which began in West Virginia in response to the cutting of wages. Organized largely by the Knights of Labor and the Marxist-leaning Workingmen’s Party, the strike led about 500 people across the river as an act of solidarity. In all almost one thousand workers went on strike. The protest soon transformed from the disgruntlement of a couple hundred railroad workers to thousands of workers in several industries for an eight-hour day and ban on child labor. The strike was an effective, bloodless takeover by dissatisfied commerce and transportation workers. An elective committee was created to command the strike and continued to gain momentum with newsboys, boatmen, bakers, and many more joining the ranks. The general strike of St. Louis ended sadly when a couple thousand federal troops and special police killed about eighteen people in skirmishes around the city.

Archival print from high-resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eads_Bridge

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Texas and New Mexico

 

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This map of Texas and New Mexico shows the impact of geography on human affairs, with the Gulf Coastal Plain and Interior Lowlands well settled while the High Plains area, the LLano Estacado – one of the largest mesas in North America,  a treeless, almost completely arid sweep of geography larger than the state of Indiana- is as empty of settlement as it is of rivers.

It is in Texas that the seeds of the future American Southwest were sown. The Mexican Province of  Coahuila y Tejas allowed immigration from the United States (1821). The Mexican population soon found themselves outnumbered, and the new settlers in 1836  gained independence. After being granted statehood by the United States (1845), a boundary dispute over the western boundaries of Texas led to the Mexican American War (1846) which resulted in the 1848 Mexican Cessation which ceded New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, parts of Colorado, and all of California to the United States.

In 1874, people from all over Texas gathered to witness the inauguration of Democrat Richard Coke as governor. The event would mark the end of Reconstruction and radical military rule in the state. Incumbent E. J. Davis, however, refused to step down, declaring the election invalid. He was supported by radical Republicans and eventually took control of the lower level of the old capitol building, increasing tensions to the point that any violence could easily trigger a destructive uprising. Davis sent a proclamation to the Legislature, which they ignored. Instead, they organized and secured control of the legislative chambers on the second level of the capitol building. The Legislature confirmed Coke’s position and he was inaugurated on January 15th. Texas was now left with two governments holed up in one building. The state was in standoff. After repeatedly being denied military assistance from the federal government, Davis gave in. Reconstruction finally came to an end and Coke began a century long Democratic reign on Texas.

In 1881, Billy the Kid, “the Robin Hood of New Mexico”, was shot in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. Born William Henry McCarty Jr., Billy was a gunman turned frontier outlaw of the American Old West. Legend dictates that he murdered 21 men, but factual evidence suggests his total was between four and nine. Billy was described as blue eyed, and baby faced with prominent front teeth. At times, he was said to be quite personable and charming. Incredibly agile, he was cunning and incredibly skilled with firearms. Exceedingly intelligent, the boy was had a knack for manipulating people. Billy had been on the run since the age of 15. He was largely unknown until a price was placed on his head by New Mexico’s governor, Lew Wallace, which catapulted him to fame in 1881. He became nationally famous, a mythical icon and symbol of American glory. The people he was fighting against were criminals, as Lincoln Country was in a state of near-anarchy. Billy the Kid’s legend joined ranks with Jesse James and Butch Cassidy, also notorious criminals, symbolizing the American regard for violence as the most honorable and heroic form of action.

Archival print from high-resolution scan.  24″ x 15″

 

 

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Time Zones of the World

 

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From the Mitchell World Atlas this “Time Zones of the World” piece is a provocative addition to the Atlas as a whole. Gives us a broad and very graphic sense that time and space are relative. The reference at the bottom of the time zones map to “Air Line Distance” might be better understood to mean “as the crow flies”, since 1874 saw nothing as exotic as flying machines.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas – Trade Routes of Asia

 

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Trade routes of Asia are detailed on this map from the 1874 Mitchell Atlas of the World. The Grape and Vine border and hand coloring of the original make all the maps of this atlas particularly handsome.

For centuries, the Europeans traded with traders from Asia. They sought jewels, clothes, gold, spices, spices, and other luxury items. The journey to Asia from their respective European countries, however, proved tumultuous. Until water routes were discovered in the Far East, only a land route existed. Travel through the Middle East, Turkey, and other Islamic Empires could be quite dangerous. So, the Europeans resolved to travel only part of the way to the Middle East. At these crossroads, they traded their goods for those of the Asian countries. When trade came to an abrupt stop in the 15th century, the Europeans looked to the seas as an alternate route.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 12″ x 15″

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1874 Mitchell World Atlas-Chile-Bolivia

 

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From the 1874 Mitchell Atlas of the World. A beautiful hand colored map of South America, namely Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay. Mitchell’s signature grape and vine border.

By 1875, Brazil was providing about half of the world’s coffee. Ideal conditions for the cultivation of coffee include high elevation and a tropical climate, both present in parts of Brazil. Today, it still remains the world’s largest producer, making about a third of all coffee. The crop was first introduced during the 19th century. It was not native to the Americas and had to be planted. It reached its peak in 1920s, supplying 80 percent of the world’s coffee.

The Paraguayan War, a conflict fought between Paraguay and the Triple Alliance of Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay, ended with the defeat of Paraguay in 1870. The war had caused more deaths proportionally to the number of soldiers than any other war in modern history. Up to 200,000 people are said to have died because of the war. Paraguay took decades to recover from the chaos and population imbalance, as their male population was left devastated, caused by this conflict. The event helped bring an end to slavery in Brazil, moved its military to a important role internationally, and caused a terrible increase in public debt, which led to a reduction in the country’s growth. In Argentina, some say the war played a role in its consolidation as a nation-state.

The expulsion of Jesuits in 1767 had a startling impact on Chilean medicine in colonial times.  King Charles III’s decision to expel the Jesuits resulted in the clear deterioration of medical development. The group had concentrated the culture elite and made up many of the best professionals and libraries.  A severe shortage in practicing doctors seriously handicapped the fight against smallpox and other plagues. It wasn’t until the installation of the Republic and creation of the University of Chile that medical development thrived again.

Túpac Katari served as leader in the Bolivian indigenous people’s rebellions against the Spanish Empire in the early 1780s. With an army of 40,000, he laid siege to La Paz in 1781. The siege was maintained for 184 days, until Spanish troops defeated the rebel army. Though eventually tortured gruesomely and executed, Katari is remembered as a hero by modern indigenous movements, who have dubbed themselves the Katarismo.

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1879 Moosabec Reach, Maine – United States Coastal Survey

 

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More of a navigational chart of Moosabec Reach than a Coastal Survey Map, this piece is nonetheless a beautiful and detailed document of the surveyor’s and cartographer’s arts. From Moose Neck in the West to the Spruce Islands in the East. Great Wass and Beals Islands,Jonesport.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 26″

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1882 Penobscot Bay, Maine – United States Coastal Survey

 

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This 1882 Coastal Survey shows upper Penobscot Bay,Castine up river to Bangor. Topography,foliation,roads and property boundary lines. Original hand-coloring adds to the art quality of this reproduction giclee print,beautiful framed and local delivery can be arranged.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 24″ x 36″

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1893 Massachusetts – Cyclists maps Plate 10

 

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This is a reproduction print of a beautiful map that I recently hand-colored. It is plate number 10 in a series of ten maps of Massachusetts.
1893 Massachusetts Cyclists Maps published for the Mass. Div. L.A.W. by William T. Oliver, Lynn, Ma. I’ll post the other nine maps soon.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 23″ x 24″

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1910 East Penobscot Bay, Maine – United States Coastal Survey

 

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United States Coastal Survey. East Penobscot Bay. This print is from a hand colored (watercolors) original I did a few years ago

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 24″x 33″

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1917 Mount Kineo Maine Fire Tower Map Colored

 

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1917 Mount Kineo Maine Fire Tower Map is one of a hundred or so maps that were used by Fire Wardens in the State of Maine to assist in pinpointing the exact location of smoke indicating a beginning forest fire. The maps used in the Maine Fire Towers were positioned flat on the plane of the map table, with the views oriented accurately toward the mountains on the horizon line. An instrument like a telescope/surveyor’s transit called an “Alidade” that rotated a full 360 degrees was used to calculate a very precise sighting. That information was generally confirmed by triangulation with another Tower within sight of the smoke. Crews could then be dispatched to put out the blaze. This method makes use of elementary geometry, but the accuracy of the alidade and the amount of work to collect the data for the maps and execute them constitute sophisticated endeavors.  This image is the original with a ” blue” band for the horizon view. The hand coloring of the land map inner part of the circle was done by John R. Barrows of Galeyrie.

 

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1937 Montana Frontier & Pioneer

 

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1937 Montana Frontier & Pioneer. Around 1880, my Grandfather, John R. Barrows, joined his father, A.R. Barrows at a trading post he had established near present day Judith Gap, MT. There was a sawmill operation and eventually a small ranch operation run by Barrows there, and a town grew as planned by my Great Grandfather to include a Blacksmith, Hardware and Dry Goods (Gaugler) store, and perhaps most significantly, a stage stop, Hotel and Post Office at Ubet, Montana.The town burned in 1903. There is a Cemetery there that is looked after by the Ubet 4H club. There is a large Monument at the State road nearby, North of Judith Gap.

Irvin Shope illustrated this map in 1937 for the Montana Highway Dept. I added the hand coloring and the name of the town my Great Grandfather built. The map is full of the colorful lore of early Montana.

Sally Barrows adds: John’s grandfather’s stories were published in magazines during his lifetime, and are on microfiche at the Montana Historical Society. In his later years, totally blind, he dictated these stories to his wife, placing them in the context of his own history, coming to Montana up the Missouri River at age 17 & adventures riding for Granville Stuart. This manuscript was published in 1934 as Ubet, A Greenhorn in Old Montana, republished in 1990 by University of Nebraska Press.

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1938 Maine Atlas – Androscoggin County Plate 01

 

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1938 Maine Atlas-Androscoggin County Plate 01. An archival reproduction of a hand colored map of Androscoggin County, Maine. Auburn,Lewiston,Livermore and Livermore Falls,Turner,Leeds,Minot,Greene,Wales,Mechanic Falls,Poland,Durham,Lisbon and Webster.

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 02

 

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1938 Maine Atlas-Aroostook County Plate 02. From the Maine State General Highway Atlas of 1938. This map and the maps of this entire atlas have been hand colored by John Barrows. The Saint John  and the Allagash River are a huge part of Maine’s logging history. Township 20, Range 11 and 12 at the North end of Beau Lake and bordering Quebec with New Brunswick, Canada to the East.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 15″ x 24″Giclee print $39.95

 

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 03

 

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1938 Maine Atlas-Aroostook County Plate 03.Showing the Plantations of Saint Francis, Saint John, Wallagrass and New Canada. The Townships of Fort Kent, Eagle Lake and Winterville among others.The Saint John River borders the State of Maine and Canada here.

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 04

 

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 04.Hand colored archival reproduction. Showing Frenchville, St.Agatha, Madawaska, Grand Isle, Van Buren, Cyr, Hamlin and Caswell Plantations, Stockholm, New Sweden and Westmanland Plantation. Others.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 24″

 

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 05

 

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Plate No. 5 of the Maine State General Atlas of 1938. This is a hand colored archival reproduction of one of nine sections of Aroostook County. All Township/Range,T11-R13 to T18-R13.

This map has yet to be “photoshopped” to remove the more distracting stains. Please contact us regarding this work if you would like to order the map.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 24″

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 06

 

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Plate No.6 from the 1938 Maine State Atlas of Aroostook County. This plate and the entire atlas have sharp detail and have been hand colored by John Barrows. Showing Township and Range areas,T11-R10 to T14-R12.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 24″

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 07

 

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Plate No.7 from the Maine State Atlas of 1938. Hand colored,archival reproduction of a very detailed map of this portion of Aroostook County,Maine. Showing Portage Lake,Nashville,Garfield and Oxbow Plantations,Ashland and Masardis. Townsip and Range areas.The Aroostook and Machias Rivers.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 24″

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 08

 

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Plate No. 8 from the Maine State Atlas of 1938 Aroostook County. This hand colored map shows great detail. Perham, Woodland, Caribou, Limestone, Wade, Washburn, Fort Fairfield, Castle Hill, Mapleton, Presque Isle, Chapman,Easton,Westfield,Mars Hill, Squapan, Blaine and Bridgewater. Squapan Lake and the Aroostook River.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 24″

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 09

 

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Plate 9 from the 1938 Aroostook County , General Atlas of Maine. Hand colored by John Barrows, showing the Towns of Bridgewater, Monticello, Littleton, Houlton, Hodgdon, Linneus, Limerick, Ludlow, Hammond Plt. Wells, Dudley, Smyrna, Oakfield, Dyer Brook, Merrill, Webbertown, St.Croix, Moro, Hersey, and Township/Range areas.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 24″

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1938 Maine Atlas – Aroostook County Plate 10

 

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Plate 10 from the Maine State Atlas, Aroostook County, 1938. Hand colored and highly detailed map of Maine’s largest county. Sherman, Forkstown, Amity, Benedicta, Silver Ridge, Glenwood, Haynesville, Orient, Reed Plt., Bancroft, Weston, Molunkus, Macwahoc Plt.,East Grand Lake.

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1938 Maine Atlas – Cumberland County Plate 11

 

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Plate 11 from the Maine State Atlas, Cumberland County,1938. Hand colored by John Barrows. Bridgton, Harrison, Otisfield, Naples, Casco, Raymond, New Gloucester, Sebago and Gray. Baldwin, Standish, Windham and Gorham. Sebago lake among many others.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 24″

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1938 Maine Atlas – Cumberland County Plate 12

 

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Plate 12 from the Maine State Atlas, Cumberland County,1938. Hand colored by John R. Barrows. Showing Casco Bay from Scarboro and Cape Elizabeth through South Portland,Portland, Westbrook and Falmouth. Cumberland, North Yarmouth and Yarmouth, Pownal,Freeport, Brunswick and Harpswell. Long Island and Great Chebeague Island are “new” towns.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 24″

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1938 Maine Atlas – Cumberland County.

 

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1938 Cumberland County,Maine map is a composite of two plates; No.11 and 12 from the Maine State Atlas, hand colored by John R. Barrows. Showing Casco Bay from Scarborough and Cape Elizabeth through South Portland, Portland,Westbrook and Falmouth. Cumberland, North Yarmouth and Yarmouth, Pownal, Freeport, Brunswick and Harpswell. Long Island and Great Chebeague Island are “new” towns. The “inland towns” are Bridgton, Harrison, Otisfield, Naples, Casco, Raymond, New Gloucester, Sebago and Gray. Baldwin, Standish, Windham and Gorham. Sebago lake among many others.

24″ x 24″ Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan.

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Price: $49.95

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1938 Maine Atlas – Franklin County Plate 13

 

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Plate 13 of the 1938 Maine General Atlas, Franklin County, Northernmost portion. Shows Gorham Gore,Beattie,Lowelltown Merrill Strip and Coburn Gore. Massachusetts Gore, Chain of Ponds,Seven Ponds,Alder Stream,Jim Pond,Stetsontown,Tim Pond and Eustis. The whole of Kennebago Lake,the North Branch of the Dead River alongside Route 4.

Archival reproduction print from high resolution scan. 18″ x 24″

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Price: $39.95

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